Chapter 11

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DEFINITION of 'Chapter 11'

Named after the U.S. bankruptcy code 11, Chapter 11 is a form of bankruptcy that involves a reorganization of a debtor's business affairs and assets. It is generally filed by corporations which require time to restructure their debts.

Chapter 11 gives the debtor a fresh start, subject to the debtor's fulfillment of its obligations under its plan of reorganization.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Chapter 11'

A Chapter 11 reorganization is the most complex of all bankruptcy cases and generally the most expensive. It should be considered only after careful analysis and exploration of all other alternatives.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the differences between Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy?

    There are a number of differences between Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy, including eligibility, cost and amount of ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What happens when a corporation declares bankruptcy?

    When a corporation faces severe financial challenges that cause its inability to repay debt obligations, filing for protection ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What happens to a company's stocks and bonds when it declares chapter 11 bankruptcy ...

    Filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection simply means that a company is on the verge of bankruptcy, but believes that ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Does a shareholder lose all of their equity once a Chapter 11 bankruptcy is filed ...

    When a company files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the management of the company is still in charge of the daily operations. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the differences between chapter 7 and chapter 11 bankruptcy?

    Chapter 7 bankruptcy is sometimes also called liquidation bankruptcy. Firms experiencing this form of bankruptcy are past ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are some alternatives a company can attempt prior to resorting to liquidation?

    Some alternatives a company's owners can attempt prior to resorting to liquidation are selling the company, raising money ... Read Full Answer >>
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