Charge Card

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DEFINITION of 'Charge Card'

A card that charges no interest but requires the user to pay his/her balance in full upon receipt of the statement, usually on a monthly basis. While it is similar to a credit card, the major benefit offered by a charge card is that it has much higher, often unlimited, spending limits.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Charge Card'

Costs associated with a charge card will often be a set fee for the card along with large penalties on any unpaid balances. This type of card does not allow cardholders to carry a balance from one month to the next as they would with a credit card. American Express and Diner's Club are examples of charge cards.

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