Charitable Contributions Deduction

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DEFINITION of 'Charitable Contributions Deduction'

One of the itemized deductions available for taxpayers who donate to charity. The Charitable Contributions Deduction allows taxpayers to deduct all of their contributions to qualifying charitable contributions of cash and property within certain limitations. These deductions must be listed on Schedule A of the 1040.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Charitable Contributions Deduction'

The Charitable Contributions Deduction allows taxpayers who make substantial charitable gifts to take a sizeable tax deduction for the year in which their donations are made. The rules for deducting these gifts can be somewhat complicated in certain instances. Taxpayers with questions about the deductibility of their gifts should download the instructions for Schedule A off of the IRS website.

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