Charter

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DEFINITION of 'Charter'

A legal document that provides for the creation of a corporate entity. A corporation's charter is issued by either a federal or a regional government and effectively creates a legal entity out of the business, which existed only as a partnership, sole proprietorship or similar business before incorporating.

Also referred to as "articles of incorporation".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Charter'

A corporation's charter, once issued by the government of jurisdiction, will vary in structure depending on the country in which it's issued. However, most charters usually include the corporation's name, the location of its head office, the date of incorporation, the amount/type of stock to be issued and any restrictions on areas of business activity or further share issuances.

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