Chartered Bank

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DEFINITION

A financial institution whose primary roles are to accept and safeguard monetary deposits from individuals and organizations, and to lend money out. The details vary from country to country, but usually a chartered bank in operation has obtained government permission on some level to do business in the banking sector.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Chartered banks provide the core financial intermediary services necessary in today's economy; individuals can easily deposit their funds into various types of accounts within a chartered bank, earning interest on their temporary savings. Chartered banks maintain a float of currency so they can process customers' daily transactions, but they lend out the majority of their deposits to individuals and commercial borrowers in an effort to stimulate economic growth.


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