Checkbook

DEFINITION of 'Checkbook'

A folder or small book containing preprinted paper instruments issued to checking account holders and used to pay for goods or services. A checkbook contains sequentially numbered checks that account holders can use as a bill of exchange. The checks are usually preprinted with the account holder's name, address and other identifying information. In addition, each check will also include the bank's routing number, the account number and the check number.

BREAKING DOWN 'Checkbook'

A checkbook is comprised of a series of checks that can be used to make purchases, pay bills, etc. With the advent of online commerce and banking, more people are making purchases and paying bills online, thereby reducing or eliminating the need for paper checkbooks. Checkbooks include a set quantity of numbered checks, and, in addition, usually contain some type of register in which users can keep track of check details and balance account statements

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