Child And Dependent Care Credit

DEFINITION of 'Child And Dependent Care Credit'

A non-refundable tax credit for unreimbursed childcare expenses paid by working taxpayers. The Child and Dependent Care Credit is designed to encourage taxpayers to pay childcare expenses so that they can remain gainfully employed.

The Child and Dependent Care Credit is claimed on Form 2441 for taxpayers that are filing Form 1040, or Schedule 2 for Form 1040A.

BREAKING DOWN 'Child And Dependent Care Credit'

The taxpayer, the care provider, the dependent/dependents must all meet certain requirements in order for the taxpayer to qualify for the credit. The Child and Dependent Care Credit is limited to a range of 20% to 35% of $3,000 for one qualifying child or dependent under age 13 or $6,000 for two or more qualifying persons, depending on the taxpayer's Adjusted Gross Income.

For more information, see IRS instructions for Form 2441.

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