Chill

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DEFINITION of 'Chill'

Special restrictions that can be placed on a given security by the Depository Trust Company (DTC). Chill restrictions are intended to limit the potential for problems within the financial marketplace, and can be placed on a security for various reasons.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Chill'

Owned by many financial companies including the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), the DTC acts as a clearinghouse for stock exchange securities, settling trades in corporate and municipal securities. If the DTC has cause to be concerned about a specific security currently processed through its system, it may place a "chill" status on the security. This will restrict brokerages' ability to transfer the shares or units of the security through DTC until the security's issues are cleared up or it ceases trading on the market.

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