Composite Index Of Lagging Indicators

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DEFINITION of 'Composite Index Of Lagging Indicators'

An index published monthly by the Conference Board that is used to confirm the direction of the economy's movements in past months. The index is made up of the following seven economic components, whose changes tend to come after changes in the overall economy:

1. The value of outstanding commercial and industrial loans
2. The change in the Consumer Price Index for services from the previous month
3. The change in labor cost per unit of labor output
4. The ratio of manufacturing and trade inventories to sales made
5. The ratio of consumer credit outstanding to personal income
6. The average prime rate charged by banks
7. The inverted average length of employment

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Composite Index Of Lagging Indicators'

As it measures the economic activities of previous months, the Composite Index of Lagging Indicators is used as an after-the-fact way to help confirm economists' assessments of current economic conditions. For this purpose, the Composite Index of Lagging Indicators is best used in conjunction with the Composite Index of Coincident Indicators and Composite Index of Leading Indicators.

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