Composite Index of Leading Indicators

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Composite Index of Leading Indicators'

An index published monthly by the Conference Board used to predict the direction of the economy's movements in the months to come. The index is made up of 10 economic components, whose changes tend to precede changes in the overall economy. These 10 components include:

1. the average weekly hours worked by manufacturing workers
2. the average number of initial applications for unemployment insurance
3. the amount of manufacturers' new orders for consumer goods and materials
4. the speed of delivery of new merchandise to vendors from suppliers
5. the amount of new orders for capital goods unrelated to defense
6. the amount of new building permits for residential buildings
7. the S&P 500 stock index
8. the inflation-adjusted monetary supply (M2)
9. the spread between long and short interest rates
10. consumer sentiment

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Composite Index of Leading Indicators'

The Composite Index of Leading Indicators is a number that is used by many economic participants to judge what is going to happen in the near future. By looking at the Composite Index of Leading Indicators in the light of business cycles and general economic conditions, investors and businesses can form expectations about what's ahead, and make better-informed decisions.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Business Cycle

    The fluctuations in economic activity that an economy experiences ...
  2. Investment Climate

    The economic and financial conditions in a country that affect ...
  3. Composite Index Of Lagging Indicators

    An index published monthly by the Conference Board that is used ...
  4. Leading Indicator

    A measurable economic factor that changes before the economy ...
  5. Consumer Confidence Index - CCI

    A survey by the Conference Board that measures how optimistic ...
  6. Composite Index of Coincident Indicators

    An index published by the Conference Board that is a broad-based ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    What are leading, lagging and coincident indicators? What are they for?

    An indicator is anything that can be used to predict future financial or economic trends. For example, the social and economic statistics published by accredited sources such as U.S. government ...
  2. Markets

    A Guide To Conference Board Indicators

    Learn to put the CB data sets to trading use. Each chapter takes you through one of the board's benchmark indicators or surveys, their significance and their applications.
  3. Retirement

    Economic Indicators To Know

    The economy has a large impact on the market. Learn how to interpret the most important reports.
  4. Economics

    What are some limitations of the consumer price index (CPI)?

    Explore some of the basic limitations of the widely used economic indicator, the consumer price index, or CPI, and examine the criticism of its accuracy.
  5. Economics

    Can the consumer price index (CPI) for individual areas be used to compare living cost among areas?

    Understand why the Consumer Price Index, or CPI, cannot appropriately be used for comparing the cost of living across different areas of the country.
  6. Economics

    Does the consumer price index (CPI) correlate with the change in price of goods and services?

    See why the consumer price index is a questionable proxy for inflation, and why it is unlikely to represent experiences with price changes accurately.
  7. Economics

    Is the consumer price index (CPI) a cost of living index?

    Explore the consumer price index (CPI) and understand why it is not an actual cost of living index although it is often identified as one.
  8. Investing

    What Are The Latest News On The Beer Industry?

    Beer isn’t a traditional commodity, as there are no futures markets associated with it, but it is considered an alternative investment.
  9. Economics

    How do debt issues affect governments' abilities to run fiscal deficits?

    Read about whether or not debt issues affect the federal government's ability to run fiscal deficits, and find out what those impacts are.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    What's the difference between r-squared and adjusted r-squared?

    Learn how R-squared and adjusted R-squared values differ, how they are calculated, the relationship between them and how to use them to make accurate estimates.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  2. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  3. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  4. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  5. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  6. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
Trading Center