Corporate Inflation-Linked Securities

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DEFINITION of 'Corporate Inflation-Linked Securities'

Corporate debt financing securities that offer their holders protection against fluctuations in the rate of inflation as measured by the consumer price index (CPI). The yields of these securities adjust monthly with respect to the current rate of inflation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Corporate Inflation-Linked Securities'

Although they are not as common as conventional debt instruments, inflation-protected corporate debt can provide an investor with a balanced risk exposure: these securities pose all of the normal risks associated with regular corporate debt securities - such as default risk - but they remove the possibility of inflationary changes eroding their real returns.

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