CINS Number

AAA

DEFINITION of 'CINS Number'

An extension to the CUSIP numbering system, which is used to uniquely identify securities offered outside of the United States and Canada. Just as with CUSIP numbers, the CINS number consists of nine characters. International securities, whether corporate or municipal, are identified by a CINS number. CINS is an abbreviation for CUSIP International Numbering System.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'CINS Number'

CINS was conceived in the 1980s as part of an effort to extend the CUSIP system to international securities. Currently, the CINS system contains entries for approximately 1.3 million different securities. Just as with CUSIP numbers, CINS number consist of nine characters. Each issuer is assigned a unique six-digit number. The next two characters identify the unique security issue. The final character is a check digit to help ensure the first eight digits were received or entered accurately. A unique feature of the CINS system is that the first character is always an a letter signifying the domicile country of the issuer.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Valoren Number

    An identification number assigned to financial instruments in ...
  2. Dummy CUSIP Number

    A temporary identification number attached to a security by a ...
  3. International Securities Identification ...

    A code that uniquely identifies a specific securities issue. ...
  4. CUSIP Number

    An identification number assigned to all stocks and registered ...
  5. Stock Exchange Daily Official List ...

    A unique identification code, consisting of seven alphanumeric ...
  6. Dividend

    A distribution of a portion of a company's earnings, decided ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do you get a hard copy of a stock certificate?

    Before online brokers and personally-directed accounts, holding a physical stock certificate was a necessity, as this was ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a company decide when it is going to split its stock?

    There are no set guidelines or requirements that determine when a company will split its stock. Often, companies that see ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why are some spin-offs taxable and some are tax-free?

    The manner in which a parent company structures the spinoff and divests itself of a subsidiary or division determines whether ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Which has performed better historically, the stock market or real estate?

    For the majority of U.S. history – or at least as far back as reliable information goes – housing prices have increased only ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What's the difference between cash-on-delivery differ and delivery against payment?

    Cash on delivery and delivery versus payment describe different procedures and timing of payments. Cash on delivery describes ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I use Trade Volume Index (TVI) to create a forex trading strategy?

    The trade volume index (TVI) indicates whether a security is being accumulated or distributed and is calculated using intraday ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Broker Or Trader: Which Career Is Right For You?

    A day in the life of a broker or trader is an exciting and varied one. Find out how to decide between these two financial professions.
  2. Investing

    Steady Growth Stocks Win The Race

    Take a page from the fable of the tortoise and the hare by investing in these constant growth stocks.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    The Fundamental Mechanics Of Investing

    Here's a story that demonstrates why stocks and bonds were created and how they are valued.
  4. Investing Basics

    The Lowdown On Penny Stocks

    Think penny stocks will make you rich? If you don't understand the risks, you could end up penniless.
  5. Active Trading

    Profiting From Panic Selling

    When everyone rushes to dump their stocks, you may find yourself with a great buying opportunity. Learn about it here.
  6. Active Trading Fundamentals

    The Basics Of Trading A Stock

    Taking control of your portfolio means knowing what orders to use when buying or selling stocks.
  7. Investing Basics

    Understanding Open-End Funds

    An open-end fund is a type of mutual fund that does not limit the amount of shares it issues, but issues as many shares as investors are willing to buy.
  8. Investing Basics

    What is a Nominal Value?

    The nominal value of a security, such as a stock or bond, remains fixed for the duration of its life.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  10. Investing

    The Strong Dollar’s (Real) Toll On Tech Stocks

    A large portion of U.S. technology companies’ sales occur overseas, given the strong international business and consumer demand from many U.S. tech firms.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  2. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  3. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  4. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  5. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  6. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
Trading Center