Chief Information Officer - CIO

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Chief Information Officer - CIO'

A company executive who is responsible for the management, implementation and usability of information and computer technologies. The CIO will analyze how these technologies can benefit the company or improve an existing business process and will then integrate a system to realize that benefit or improvement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS'Chief Information Officer - CIO'

The number of CIOs has increased greatly with the expanded use of IT and computer technology in businesses. The CIO will deal with matters such as creating a website that allows the company to reach more customers or integrating new inventory software to help better manage the use of inventory.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Board Of Directors - B Of D

    A group of individuals that are elected as, or elected to act ...
  2. Information Silo

    An information management system that is unable to freely communicate ...
  3. Corporate Headquarters

    A place where a company's executive offices and executives' direct ...
  4. C-Suite

    A widely-used slang term used to collectively refer to a corporation's ...
  5. Chief Executive Officer - CEO

    The highest ranking executive in a company whose main responsibilities ...
  6. Chief Financial Officer - CFO

    The senior manager responsible for overseeing the financial activities ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    The Basics Of Corporate Structure

    CEOs, CFOs, presidents and vice presidents: learn how to tell the difference.
  2. Options & Futures

    Governance Pays

    Learn about how the way a company keeps its management in check can affect the bottom line.
  3. Professionals

    Are Stock Buybacks Always Good for Shareholders?

    Stock buyback programs aren't always done with the interests of shareholders in mind. It's important to try to understand the motivation behind such moves.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Making Sense of Netflix's Balance Sheet

    Understand how to assess Netflix's performance based on the major components of its balance sheet.
  5. Economics

    Understanding the Top Line

    Top line refers to a company’s gross sales without any reductions for discounts or returns.
  6. Economics

    What's an Allowance for Doubtful Accounts?

    The allowance for doubtful accounts represents the percentage of the accounts receivable the company expects to write-off as uncollectible.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding Activity Ratios

    Activity ratios measure how effectively a business uses its assets.
  8. Investing Basics

    What is Accrued Income?

    In a mutual fund, accrued income is earnings that have accumulated over the year, but have not yet been paid out to shareholders.
  9. Investing

    Acorns: The Perfect Investing Tool For Millennials

    We look at how the Acorns app works, how it makes money, and why is it innovative.
  10. Investing

    4 Structured Product Types Wealthy Clients Love

    High-net-worth investors find structured products appealing for a variety of reasons. Here's a look at four types.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do the C-suite members work together to make a successful company?

    Corporate managers, typically chosen by a board of directors in large organizations, are ultimately responsible to stakeholders ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between a president and a chief executive officer? Can there ...

    In general, the chief executive officer (CEO) is thought of as the highest ranking officer in a company while the president ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Nanny Tax

    A federal tax that must be paid by people who hire household help (a babysitter, maid, gardener, etc.) and pay them a total ...
  2. Dog And Pony Show

    A colloquial term that generally refers to a presentation or seminar to market new products or services to potential buyers.
  3. Topless Meeting

    A meeting in which participants are not allowed to use laptops. A topless meeting organizer can also ban the use of smartphones, ...
  4. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  5. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  6. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!