Chief Information Officer - CIO

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DEFINITION of 'Chief Information Officer - CIO'

A company executive who is responsible for the management, implementation and usability of information and computer technologies. The CIO will analyze how these technologies can benefit the company or improve an existing business process and will then integrate a system to realize that benefit or improvement.

BREAKING DOWN 'Chief Information Officer - CIO'

The number of CIOs has increased greatly with the expanded use of IT and computer technology in businesses. The CIO will deal with matters such as creating a website that allows the company to reach more customers or integrating new inventory software to help better manage the use of inventory.

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