Class Action


DEFINITION of 'Class Action'

An action where an individual represents a group in a court claim. The judgment from the suit is for all the members of the group (class).

BREAKING DOWN 'Class Action'

This is often done when shareholders launch a lawsuit, mainly because it would be too expensive for each individual shareholder to launch their own law suit.

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