Clayton Antitrust Act

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DEFINITION of 'Clayton Antitrust Act'

An amendment passed by the U.S. Congress in 1914 that provides further clarification and substance to the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890. The Clayton Antitrust Act attempts to prohibit certain actions that lead to anti-competitiveness.

BREAKING DOWN 'Clayton Antitrust Act'

The Clayton Antitrust Act provides barriers to a broad range of anti-competitiveness issues. For example, topics such as price discrimination, price fixing and unfair business practices are addressed in the Act. They are enforced by the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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