Clean Bill Of Lading

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DEFINITION of 'Clean Bill Of Lading'

A bill of lading issued by a carrier declaring that the goods have been received in an appropriate condition, without the presence of defects. The product carrier will issue a clean bill after thoroughly inspecting the packages for any damage, missing quantities or deviations in quality.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Clean Bill Of Lading'

Often, a clean bill of lading must be issued to fulfill the requirements set forth in letters of credit. Many purchasers rely on letters of credit to pay for imports and banks may refuse to supply the funds if a claused bill of lading is presented. A claused or foul bill is issued when the received product is damaged or does not meet specifications.

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