Clean Balance Sheet

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DEFINITION of 'Clean Balance Sheet'

A company's financial statement that summarizes its assets, liabilities and shareholder equity, and where the company is shown to have very little or no debt. A clean balance sheet indicates the company has no significant debt during the statement period. A company that has a lot of debt may be advised to "clean up its balance sheet" in order to become more attractive to investors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Clean Balance Sheet'

A clean balance sheet is challenging to maintain, especially for businesses that derive a significant percentage of yearly revenues from seasonal activity. Many investors find companies with clean balance sheets attractive because the minimal leverage reduces downside risks.

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