Cleantech

A A A

DEFINITION

A shortened form of "clean technologies", a term used to describe an investment philosophy used by investors seeking to profit from environmentally friendly companies. Cleantech firms seek to increase performance, productivity and efficiency by minimizing negative effects on the environment.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Clean technology is generally used to describe companies that deal in energy, water, transportation, agriculture and manufacturing. Investment in "environmental friendly" companies has grown and there are now many funds wholly aimed at investing in these types of securities.


RELATED TERMS
  1. Sin Stock

    A stock of a company that is either involved in or associated with an activity ...
  2. American Clean Energy And Security ...

    A piece of legislation that was created in an attempt to establish an economy-wide ...
  3. Socially Responsible Investment ...

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature ...
  4. Social Responsibility

    The idea that companies should embrace its social responsibilities and not be ...
  5. Domini 400 Social Index

    A market cap weighted stock index of 400 publicly traded companies that have ...
  6. Green Fund

    A mutual fund or other investment vehicle that will only invest in companies ...
  7. Biodiesel

    A fuel derived from organic oils, such as vegetable oil, rather than petroleum. ...
  8. Michael Bloomberg

    Michael Bloomberg is one of the wealthiest persons in the world with an estimated ...
  9. Mark Zuckerberg

    Self-taught computer programmer and self-made multi-billionaire Mark Zuckerberg ...
  10. Sergey Brin

    Sergey Brin is best known as the co-founder of Google.
Related Articles
  1. Clean Or Green Technology Investing
    Investing

    Clean Or Green Technology Investing

  2. Go Green With Socially Responsible Investing
    Personal Finance

    Go Green With Socially Responsible Investing

  3. Sinful Investing: Is It For You?
    Investing Basics

    Sinful Investing: Is It For You?

  4. Socially Responsible Mutual Funds
    Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Socially Responsible Mutual Funds

  5. Spotlight On The Solar Industry
    Options & Futures

    Spotlight On The Solar Industry

  6. What are cleantech stocks?
    Investing

    What are cleantech stocks?

  7. Ridiculous Ideas That Made People Millions
    Personal Finance

    Ridiculous Ideas That Made People Millions

  8. Companies That Succeeded With Bootstrapping
    Investing Basics

    Companies That Succeeded With Bootstrapping

  9. Are You An Entrepreneur?
    Entrepreneurship

    Are You An Entrepreneur?

  10. Unexpected Challenges For Self-Employed ...
    Professionals

    Unexpected Challenges For Self-Employed ...

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Amplitude

    The difference in price from the midpoint of a trough to the midpoint of a peak of a security. Amplitude is positive when calculating a bullish retracement (when calculating from trough to peak) and negative when calculating a bearish retracement (when calculating from peak to trough).
  2. Ascending Triangle

    A bullish chart pattern used in technical analysis that is easily recognizable by the distinct shape created by two trendlines. In an ascending triangle, one trendline is drawn horizontally at a level that has historically prevented the price from heading higher, while the second trendline connects a series of increasing troughs.
  3. National Best Bid and Offer - NBBO

    A term applying to the SEC requirement that brokers must guarantee customers the best available ask price when they buy securities and the best available bid price when they sell securities.
  4. Maintenance Margin

    The minimum amount of equity that must be maintained in a margin account. In the context of the NYSE and FINRA, after an investor has bought securities on margin, the minimum required level of margin is 25% of the total market value of the securities in the margin account.
  5. Leased Bank Guarantee

    A bank guarantee that is leased to a third party for a specific fee. The issuing bank will conduct due diligence on the creditworthiness of the customer looking to secure a bank guarantee, then lease a guarantee to that customer for a set amount of money and over a set period of time, typically less than two years.
  6. Degree Of Financial Leverage - DFL

    A ratio that measures the sensitivity of a company’s earnings per share (EPS) to fluctuations in its operating income, as a result of changes in its capital structure. Degree of Financial Leverage (DFL) measures the percentage change in EPS for a unit change in earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT).
Trading Center