Clientele Effect

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DEFINITION of 'Clientele Effect'

The theory that a company's stock price will move according to the demands and goals of investors in reaction to a tax, dividend or other policy change affecting the company. The clientele effect assumes that investors are attracted to different company policies, and that when a company's policy changes, investors will adjust their stock holdings accordingly. As a result of this adjustment, the stock price will move.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Clientele Effect'

Consider a company that currently pays a high dividend and has attracted clientele whose investment goal is to obtain stock with a high dividend payout. If the company decides to decrease its dividend, these investors will sell their stock and move to another company that pays a higher dividend. As a result, the company's share price will decline.

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