Clifford Trust


DEFINITION of 'Clifford Trust'

Clifford Trusts allow grantors to transfer assets that produce income into the trust and then reclaim them when the trust expires. These trusts cannot last for a term of less than 10 years plus one day. Clifford Trusts were once commonly used as an effective and legal means of avoiding large tax expenses; the grantor would shift his assets to a trust which would then later be claimed by a recipient who would ideally be subject to a lower marginal tax rate.

BREAKING DOWN 'Clifford Trust'

Prior to the Tax Reform Act of 1986, Clifford Trusts were often used to shift assets that produced income to children from their parents. However, this legislation rendered this strategy impractical, as the Act mandated that Clifford Trust income must be taxed to the grantor. Therefore few of these trusts have been created since then.

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  1. Can I put my IRA in a trust?

    You cannot put your IRA in a trust while you are living. You can, however, name a trust as the beneficiary of your IRA and ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the trust maker transfer funds into a revocable trust?

    Once a revocable trust is created, a trust maker transfers funds or property into the trust by including them in a list with ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between a revocable trust and a living trust?

    A revocable trust and living trust are separate terms that describe the same thing: a trust in which the terms can be changed ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How exactly does one go about revoking a revocable trust?

    The basic steps involved in revoking a revocable trust are fairly simple, and include transfer of assets and an official ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a revocable trust and an irrevocable trust?

    An irrevocable trust and a revocable trust are differentiated through the ability to change the trust. With an irrevocable ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a family Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

    A family limited liability company (LLC) is formed by family members to conduct business in a state that permits such form ... Read Full Answer >>

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