Clintonomics

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Clintonomics'

The economic policies used by Bill Clinton, who was president of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Clintonomics refers both to the fiscal and monetary policies employed during the period, which was marked by low interest rates, trade agreements such as NAFTA and the rapid growth of the stock market.


The term Clintonomics is a portmanteau of the words "Clinton" and "economics".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Clintonomics'

Bill Clinton came to office while the United States was still recovering from a recession. He inherited Alan Greenspan as the chairman of the Federal Reserve, whose policies helped keep inflation at a relatively low rate during the advent of the internet era. Some economists believe that Clintonomics was the precipitating cause for the recession in the early 2000s, as interest rates were kept at such a low level as to create an environment marked by over-borrowing.

RELATED TERMS
  1. North American Free Trade Agreement ...

    A regulation implemented on Jan. 1, 1994, that decreased and ...
  2. Balance Of Trade - BOT

    The difference between a country's imports and its exports. Balance ...
  3. Alan Greenspan

    The former chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal ...
  4. Dotcom

    A company that embraces the internet as the key component in ...
  5. Economics

    A social science that studies how individuals, governments, firms ...
  6. Reaganomics

    A popular term used to refer to the economic policies of Ronald ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the primary sources of market risk?

    Market risk is the risk of loss due to the factors that affect an entire market or asset class. Market risk is also known ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. In what types of economies are regressive taxes common?

    Regressive taxation systems are more likely to be found in developing countries or emerging market economies than in the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the pros and cons of operating on a balanced-budget?

    Few issues are more complicated, contentious and controversial in contemporary American politics than balancing the federal ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does the law of supply and demand affect monetary policy in the United States?

    The law of supply and demand affects monetary policy in the United States through the adjustment of interest rates. Interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does it signify if there is a large discrepancy between a nation's real and ...

    A large discrepancy between a nation's real and nominal GDP signifies inflationary or deflationary forces in the economy. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do tariffs protect domestic industries?

    Tariffs are essentially taxes or duties placed on an imported good or service by a domestic government, making domestic goods ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    A Review Of Past Recessions

    Here we look at the biggest economic declines in the U.S. since the Great Depression.
  2. Economics

    What The National Debt Means To You

    The U.S. deficit seems to grow every year. But how does it actually affect you?
  3. Economics

    Understanding Supply-Side Economics

    Does the amount of goods and services produced set the pace for economic growth? Here are the arguments.
  4. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  5. Professionals

    Jobless Recovery: The New Normal Since 1990

    Just because the economy rebounds from a recession does not mean the unemployment rate will follow.
  6. Economics

    NAFTA's Winners And Losers

    Read on to find out who this free-trade agreement helped, and who it hurt.
  7. Economics

    What Part of the Money Supply is M2?

    M2 is the part of the money supply economists use to analyze and predict inflation.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Structural Unemployment

    Structural unemployment is an economic miss-match where workers fail to find jobs and employers with available jobs fail to find workers.
  9. Economics

    How The GDP Of The US Is Calculated

    The US GDP may not be a perfect economic measure, but the ability to compare it to prior periods and other countries makes it the most applicable.
  10. Economics

    One Silver Lining Of Slower Global Growth

    Stocks struggled last week amid more evidence out of the world’s largest economies that global economic growth isn’t accelerating as expected.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  2. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  3. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  4. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  5. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center