Clive W.J. Granger

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DEFINITION of 'Clive W.J. Granger'

An econometrician who received the 2003 Nobel Prize in Economics, along with Robert Engel, for his work on cointegration, an analysis of time-series data that helps forecast market movements and economic trends. His other major contribution was the concept of Granger causality. Granger's analytical methods became widely used by governments, world banks, economists and academics.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Clive W.J. Granger'

Born in Wales in 1934, Granger was a professor of applied statistics and econometrics at the University of Nottingham, where he earned his Ph.D., and a professor of economics at the University of California at San Diego, where he taught for 35 years. He died in 2009.

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