Clive W.J. Granger

DEFINITION of 'Clive W.J. Granger'

An econometrician who received the 2003 Nobel Prize in Economics, along with Robert Engel, for his work on cointegration, an analysis of time-series data that helps forecast market movements and economic trends. His other major contribution was the concept of Granger causality. Granger's analytical methods became widely used by governments, world banks, economists and academics.

BREAKING DOWN 'Clive W.J. Granger'

Born in Wales in 1934, Granger was a professor of applied statistics and econometrics at the University of Nottingham, where he earned his Ph.D., and a professor of economics at the University of California at San Diego, where he taught for 35 years. He died in 2009.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Laissez Faire

    An economic theory from the 18th century that is strongly opposed ...
  2. Econometrician

    A person who uses statistics and mathematics to study, model ...
  3. Economist

    An expert who studies the relationship between a society's resources ...
  4. Free Market

    A market economy based on supply and demand with little or no ...
  5. Microeconomics

    The branch of economics that analyzes the market behavior of ...
  6. Macroeconomics

    The field of economics that studies the behavior of the aggregate ...
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    What Are Central Banks?

    They print money, they control inflation, and much, much more. All you need to know about central banks is here.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    How Influential Economists Changed Our History

    Find out how these five groundbreaking thinkers laid our financial foundations.
  3. Economics

    Understanding Supply-Side Economics

    Does the amount of goods and services produced set the pace for economic growth? Here are the arguments.
  4. Options & Futures

    Nobel Winners Are Economic Prizes

    Before you try to profit from their theories, you should learn about the creators themselves.
  5. Investing Basics

    Economic Indicators That Do-It-Yourself Investors Should Know

    Understanding these investing tools will put the market in your hands.
  6. Economics

    The Uncertainty Of Economics: Exploring The Dismal Science

    Learning about the study of economics can help you understand why you face contradictions in the market.
  7. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  8. Economics

    The Truth about Productivity

    Why has labor market productivity slowed sharply around the world in recent years? One of the greatest economic mysteries out there.
  9. Markets

    The (Expected) Market Impact of the 2016 Election

    With primary season upon us, investor attention is beginning to turn to the upcoming U.S. presidential election.
  10. Term

    How Statistical Significance is Determined

    If something is statistically significant, it’s unlikely that it happened by chance.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What's the difference between microeconomics and macroeconomics?

    Microeconomics is generally the study of individuals and business decisions, macroeconomics looks at higher up country and ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do plane tickets get cheaper closer to the date of departure?

    The price of flights usually increases one month prior to the date of departure. Flights are usually cheapest between three ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Is Colombia an emerging market economy?

    Colombia meets the criteria of an emerging market economy. The South American country has a much lower gross domestic product, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Student loans, federal and private: what's the difference?

    The cost of a college education now rivals many home prices, making student loans a huge debt that many young people face ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What assumptions are made when conducting a t-test?

    The common assumptions made when doing a t-test include those regarding the scale of measurement, random sampling, normality ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are some of the more common types of regressions investors can use?

    The most common types of regression an investor can use are linear regressions and multiple linear regressions. Regressions ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Harry Potter Stock Index

    A collection of stocks from companies related to the "Harry Potter" series franchise. Created by StockPickr, this index seeks ...
  2. Liquidation Margin

    Liquidation margin refers to the value of all of the equity positions in a margin account. If an investor or trader holds ...
  3. Black Swan

    An event or occurrence that deviates beyond what is normally expected of a situation and that would be extremely difficult ...
  4. Inverted Yield Curve

    An interest rate environment in which long-term debt instruments have a lower yield than short-term debt instruments of the ...
  5. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
Trading Center