Close Location Value - CLV

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DEFINITION of 'Close Location Value - CLV'

A measure used in technical analysis to determine where the price of the asset closes relative to the day's high and low. The CLV ranges between +1 and -1, where a value of +1 means the close is equal to the high and a value of -1 means the close is equal to the day's low.

Close Location Value (CLV)

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Close Location Value - CLV'

The close location value is most commonly known for its role in the calculation of the accumulation/distribution line, an indicator used to determine the rate at which money flows into or out of a given security. Implementing the close location value into other technical indicators like the one mentioned above is becoming more popular because it is often regarded as a better measure for the period's activity than relying solely on the closing price.

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