Closing Range


DEFINITION of 'Closing Range'

The band of prices that a security trades at in a specified period, shortly before market close. In the futures market, it refers to the trading range or the minimum and maximum prices that a contract traded at, during the official closing period specified by the exchange.

BREAKING DOWN 'Closing Range'

The closing range for a specific security will generally not be very wide, in the case of an orderly market, but may be quite significant during periods of volatility and turmoil. A pattern of consistently higher closing ranges for a stock, in comparison to its prices over the rest of the day, may indicate that it is being subjected to a form of market manipulation known as "high close."

  1. Price Change

    The difference in the cost of an asset or security from one period ...
  2. 52-Week Range

    The lowest and highest prices at which a stock has traded in ...
  3. Closing Price

    The final price at which a security is traded on a given trading ...
  4. High Close

    A tactic used by stock manipulators; they make small trades at ...
  5. Trading Range

    The spread between the high and low prices traded during a period ...
  6. Implied Volatility - IV

    The estimated volatility of a security's price.
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