Chartered Life Underwriter - CLU

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DEFINITION of 'Chartered Life Underwriter - CLU'

A professional designation for individuals who wish to specialize in life insurance and estate planning. Individuals must complete five core courses and three elective courses, and successfully pass all eight two-hour, 100-question examinations in order to receive the designation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Chartered Life Underwriter - CLU'

Financial planners with a CFP designation will often earn the CLU designation title to demonstrate their expertise in the areas of life insurance and estate planning to existing and potential clients. Having additional knowledge in these areas gives financial planners a competitive edge over other planners with fewer credentials.

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