Certified Management Accountant - CMA

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DEFINITION of 'Certified Management Accountant - CMA'

An accounting designation whose holder has formally demonstrated a mix of expertise in financial accounting and strategic management. This certification expands on financial accounting by adding management skills that help to make strategic business decisions based on financial information.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Certified Management Accountant - CMA'

Entry to a Certified Management Accountant program requires a university degree. The program comprises a series of tests that participants need to pass to receive the designation. This accounting certification program is administered by an accounting association in each country, such as the American Accounting Association in the U.S. and the Canadian Academic Accounting Association in Canada.

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