DEFINITION of 'Cash Management Bill - CMB'

A short-term security sold by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. The maturity on a CMB can range from a few days to six months. The money raised through these issues is used by the Treasury to meet any temporary shortfalls.

BREAKING DOWN 'Cash Management Bill - CMB'

The cash management bill is the most flexible instrument of the U.S. Treasury because it can be issued when needed, allowing the Treasury to have lower cash balances and issue fewer long-term notes. CMBs tend to pay higher yields than bills with fixed maturities, but their shorter maturities lead to lower overall interest expense.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Tax Anticipation Bill - TAB

    Unique bills sold at a discount and maturing within 23 to 273 ...
  2. 30-Year Treasury

    A U.S. Treasury debt obligation that has a maturity of 30 years. ...
  3. 10-Year Treasury Note

    A debt obligation issued by the United States government that ...
  4. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt ...
  5. Constant Maturity

    An adjustment for equivalent maturity, used by the Federal Reserve ...
  6. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Introduction to Treasury Securities

    Purchasing bonds that are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government can provide steady guaranteed income and peace of mind. Knowing the characteristics of each type of treasury ...
  2. Investing

    The Differences Between Bills, Notes And Bonds

    Treasury bills, notes and bonds are all marketable securities sold by the U.S. government to pay off debts and to raise cash.
  3. Investing

    Understanding Treasury Yield

    Treasury yield refers to the return on an investment in a U.S. government debt obligation, such as a bill, note or bond.
  4. Investing

    What's a 10-Year Treasury Note?

    A 10-year Treasury note is an intermediate debt obligation issued by the United States government, and with a ten-year maturity date.
  5. Investing

    How To Read A T-Bill Quote

    If you want buy and sell US Treasury bills, you need to learn to read the quotes.
  6. Financial Advisor

    Top 4 Treasurys ETFs (SHY, IEI)

    Learn about the specifics of the top four U.S. Treasury ETFs and how investors can buy ETFs that invest in bonds along the yield curve.
  7. Investing

    Buy Treasuries Directly From The Fed

    If you want government securities, go straight to the source. We'll show you how.
  8. Investing

    What is Treasury Stock?

    Treasury stock is a company’s own stock that it holds in its treasury for later use.
  9. Investing

    The Treasury And The Federal Reserve

    Find out how these two agencies create policies to stimulate the economy in tough economic times.
  10. Investing

    The 3 Largest U.S. Government ETFs (TIP, SHY)

    Learn about the benefits of U.S. government ETFs, and explore the three largest government funds available on the market as of March 2016.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the maturity terms for Treasury bonds?

    Learn how treasury bonds pay interest, when they reach maturity and the differences between terms for treasury bonds and ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between the Daily Treasury Long-Term Rates and the Daily Treasury ...

    Find out more about the daily Treasury long-term rates, daily Treasury yield curve rates and the difference between these ... Read Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between bills, notes and bonds?

    Treasury bills (T-Bills), notes and bonds are marketable securities the U.S. government sells in order to pay off maturing ... Read Answer >>
  4. How are treasury bills taxed?

    Read about how the Internal Revenue Service collects taxes on treasury bills purchased from the United States government ... Read Answer >>
  5. Why are treasury bond yields important to investors of other securities?

    Learn about the wide-ranging impact of U.S. Treasury Bond yields on all other interest-bearing instruments in the economy ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Cover Letter

    A written document submitted with a job application explaining the applicant's credentials and interest in the open position. ...
  2. 403(b) Plan

    A retirement plan for certain employees of public schools, tax-exempt organizations and certain ministers. Generally, retirement ...
  3. Master Of Business Administration - MBA

    A graduate degree achieved at a university or college that provides theoretical and practical training to help graduates ...
  4. Liquidity Event

    An event that allows initial investors in a company to cash out some or all of their ownership shares and is considered an ...
  5. Job Market

    A market in which employers search for employees and employees search for jobs. The job market is not a physical place as ...
  6. Yuppie

    Yuppie is a slang term denoting the market segment of young urban professionals. A yuppie is often characterized by youth, ...
Trading Center