Continuous Net Settlement - CNS

DEFINITION of 'Continuous Net Settlement - CNS'

An automated book-entry accounting system. CNS centralizes the settlement of compared transactions and maintains an efficient flow of security and money balances.

BREAKING DOWN 'Continuous Net Settlement - CNS'

During the CNS process, there are reports that are generated which document the movements of money and securities. This system provides clearance for instruments like equities, corporate bonds, Unit Investment Trusts and municipal bonds.

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