Coaster

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DEFINITION of 'Coaster'

An employee with low ambition and, consequently, low productivity. The term coaster is used to describe an employee that is not very productive, or does just enough to get by.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Coaster'

Typically, coasters will show up late to work, have poor performance and frequently miss deadlines. Coasting will almost always limit your potential for advancement and promotions.

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