Certificate Of Deposit Index - CODI Index

DEFINITION of 'Certificate Of Deposit Index - CODI Index'

The 12-month average of the most recently published dealer bid rates (yields) on nationally traded three-month certificates of deposit as reported in the H.15 Federal Reserve Statistical Release. The yields are annualized using a 360-day year. For purposes of determining CODI, "published" means first made available to the public by the Federal Reserve Board. The CODI index is calculated on or near the first Monday of each calendar month and is often used for adjustable rate mortgages.

BREAKING DOWN 'Certificate Of Deposit Index - CODI Index'

Because the CODI index is a 12-month moving average, it is not as volatile as some other popular mortgage indexes such as the one-month LIBOR index. It tends to lag other mortgage indexes in the rate at which it adjusts when interest rates change.

Some mortgages, such as payment option ARMs, offer the borrower a choice of indexes. This choice should be made with some analysis. The interest rate on an adjustable-rate mortgage is known as the fully indexed interest rate - it equals the index value plus the margin. While the index is variable, the margin is fixed for the life of the mortgage. When considering which index is most economical, don't forget about the margin. The lower an index is relative to another index, the higher the margin is likely to be.

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