Coefficient of Determination

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DEFINITION of 'Coefficient of Determination'

A measure used in statistical model analysis to assess how well a model explains and predicts future outcomes. It is indicative of the level of explained variablity in the model. The coefficient, also commonly known as R-square, is used as a guideline to measure the accuracy of the model.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Coefficient of Determination'

One use of the coefficient of determination is to test the goodness of fit of the model. It is expressed as a value between zero and one. A value of one indicates a perfect fit, and therefore, a very reliable model for future forecasts. A value of zero, on the other hand, would indicate that the model fails to accurately model the dataset.

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