Co-insurance Effect

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DEFINITION of 'Co-insurance Effect'

A theory on corporate debt that posits that the likelihood of default decreases when two firms' assets and liabilities are combined through a merger or acquisition compared to the likelihood of default in the individual companies. The co-insurance effect relates to the concept of diversification, as risky debt is spread across the new firm's operations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Co-insurance Effect'

If the co-insurance effect is true, firms that merge may experience financial synergies through combining operations. Furthermore, the combined debt should be safer than before, which should reduce the yield investors demand from the corporation's bonds. This can reduce the cost of issuing new debt for the company, making it cheaper to raise additional funds.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Default

    1. The failure to promptly pay interest or principal when due. ...
  2. Diversification

    A risk management technique that mixes a wide variety of investments ...
  3. Default Risk

    The event in which companies or individuals will be unable to ...
  4. Yield

    The income return on an investment. This refers to the interest ...
  5. Merger

    The combining of two or more companies, generally by offering ...
  6. Surrender Period

    The amount of time an investor must wait until he or she can ...
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