Collar Agreement

DEFINITION of 'Collar Agreement'

An arrangement in a merger and acquisition deal that protects the buyer from significant fluctuations in the stock's price, between the time the merger begins and the time the merger is complete. Collar agreements are utilized when mergers are financed with stock rather than cash, which can be subject to significant changes in the stock's price and affect the value of the deal to the buyer and seller.

BREAKING DOWN 'Collar Agreement'

A collar establishes a range of prices within which the stock will be valued, or a range of share quantities that will be offfered to assure the buyer and seller of getting the deals they expect. It also precludes the need to negotiate the deal, once at the merger's inception and again before it closes. The primary types of collars are fixed-value collars and fixed share collars.

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