College Of Insurance


DEFINITION of 'College Of Insurance'

One of several institutions of higher learning that teach courses related to specific aspects of insurance. The College of Insurance is a specialized institution that provides undergraduate and graduate degrees in insurance, actuarial science and financial services. The college is located in the financial district of lower Manhattan.

BREAKING DOWN 'College Of Insurance'

The College of Insurance was founded in New York in 1901. Its entire curriculum was taken over by St. John's University 100 years later and now comprises its school of Risk Management, Insurance and Actuarial Science. It consists of high-tech classrooms, computer labs and the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis library.

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