COMEX

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DEFINITION of 'COMEX'

The primary market for trading metals such as gold, silver, copper and aluminum. Formerly known as the Commodity Exchange Inc., the COMEX merged with the New York Mercantile exchange in 1994 and became the division responsible for metals trading.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'COMEX'

The merger between Commodity Exchange Inc. and the New York Mercantile exchange has created the world's largest physical futures trading exchange. Since the merger in 1994, the COMEX division has incorporated the trading of aluminum future contracts.

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