Commercial Blanket Bond


DEFINITION of 'Commercial Blanket Bond'

A type of liability coverage for employers who want to protect themselves against losses resulting from dishonest employees. Commercial blanket bonds provide blanket coverage for all of an employer's employees. These bonds contain a maximum amount that they can cover for any single loss, regardless of the number of employees involved.

BREAKING DOWN 'Commercial Blanket Bond'

Commercial blanket bonds function in the same manner as position bonds in a couple of situations. Even if only one employee causes a loss, they will provide the same coverage. This also applies if the number of guilty employees cannot be determined.

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