What is a 'Commercial Loan'

A commercial loan is a debt-based funding arrangement between a business and a financial institution, typically used to fund major capital expenditures and or cover operational costs that the company may otherwise be unable to afford.

Expensive upfront costs and regulatory hurdles often prevent small businesses from having direct access to debt and equity markets for financing. Similar to consumer credit, smaller businesses must rely on other lending products, such as a line of credit, unsecured loans or term loans.

BREAKING DOWN 'Commercial Loan'

Commercial loans are granted to a variety of business entities, usually to assist with short-term funding needs for operational costs or for the purchase of equipment to facilitate the operating process. In some instances, the loan may be extended to help the business meet more basic operational needs, such as funding for payroll or to purchase smaller supplies that are used in the production and manufacturing process.

Renewable Commercial Loans

While a commercial loan is most often thought of as a short-term source of funds for a business, there are some banks or other financial institutions that offer a renewable loan. This allows the business to get the funds it needs to maintain operations and to repay the loan within its specified time period. After this, the loan may then be rolled into an additional or "renewed" loan period. A business most often seeks a renewable commercial loan when it must obtain the resources it needs to handle large seasonal orders from certain customers while still being able to provide goods to additional clients.

Securing a Commercial Loan

As is true for nearly every type of loan, how creditworthy an applicant is plays a starring role when a financial institution considers giving out a commercial loan. In most cases, the business applying for the loan will be required to present documentation, generally in the form of balance sheets and other similar documents, that prove the company has a favorable and consistent cash flow. This assures the lender that the loan can and will be repaid according to the established terms. If a company is approved for a commercial loan, it can expect to pay a rate of interest that falls in line with the prime lending rate at the time the loan is issued. Banks typically require monthly financial statements from the company through the duration of the loan, and often require the company to take out insurance on any larger items purchased with funds from the loan.

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