Commercial Grain Stock


DEFINITION of 'Commercial Grain Stock'

The current amount of harvested grain crops stored domestically, including both on-farm and off-farm storage sites. The USDA reports quarterly on the amount of grain stocks in storage and includes corn, soybeans and wheat. The amount of commercial grain stock is relevant for the supply of these grains, which are used in a large array of food products. Even meat products can be affected by the supply of grains, since grains are often used in animal feed.

BREAKING DOWN 'Commercial Grain Stock'

It is nearly impossible to actually measure the inventory of grain stock stored throughout the nation, so the figures reported by the USDA are estimated based on a variety of data inputs. The USDA also analyzes the grain stocks of other countries, so as to develop a worldwide view of grain supply which can then be matched with demand.

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