Commission Broker

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DEFINITION of 'Commission Broker'

Someone who gets paid by the brokerage company for which he works for each order of securities he executes on a customer's behalf. The commission structure can encourage unethical behavior by unscrupulous commission brokers. For example, a dishonest commission broker may engage in a practice called churning, which means executing multiple trades in a customer's account for the sole purpose of generating more commissions. The additional trades do not benefit the customer.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Commission Broker'

A broker who charges a flat fee for his or her services rather than earning a commission based on order size has more incentive to put the customer's best interest first. A flat-fee broker will not have an incentive to push a customer into certain securities because they are paying a high commission. Instead, he or she will have an incentive to get the customer into the best-performing investments so the customer will be loyal to that broker and be a steady source of business.

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