Committee On Payment And Settlement Systems - CPSS


DEFINITION of 'Committee On Payment And Settlement Systems - CPSS'

A committee made up of the central banks of G10 countries that monitors developments in payment, settlement and clearing systems in an attempt to contribute to efficient payment and settlement systems, and build strong market infrastructure. The CPSS was created in 1990, and its secretariat is hosted by the Bank for International Settlements.

BREAKING DOWN 'Committee On Payment And Settlement Systems - CPSS'

The Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems undertakes its work through specific studies by working groups as required, and publishes reports on its findings. The committee also extends its work outside of the G10 countries by creating relationships with the central banks in many emerging market economies.

  1. Netting

    Consolidating the value of two or more transactions, payments, ...
  2. Bank For International Settlements ...

    An international organization fostering the cooperation of central ...
  3. Society for Worldwide Interbank ...

    A member-owned cooperative that provides safe and secure financial ...
  4. Settlement Risk

    The risk that one party will fail to deliver the terms of a contract ...
  5. Automated Clearing House - ACH

    An electronic funds-transfer system run by the National Automated ...
  6. Real Time Gross Settlement - RTGS

    The continuous settlement of payments on an individual order ...
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