Commoditize

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DEFINITION of 'Commoditize'

The act of making a process, good or service easy to obtain by making it as uniform, plentiful and affordable as possible. Something becomes commoditized when one offering is nearly indistinguishable from another. As a result of technological innovation, broad-based education and frequent iteration, goods and services become commoditized and, therefore, widely accessible.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Commoditize'

In the past few decades, previously "modern" things such as microchips, personal computers – even the internet itself – have become essentially commoditized. Combinations of commoditized products such as computers and business software have in effect commoditized many processes, such as business accounting and supply chain management. In a truly capitalist society, the ability to commoditize anything is seen as a benefit to all, and opens up resources that can be put to better use on innovative enterprises.


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