Commodity Credit Corporation - CCC

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Commodity Credit Corporation - CCC'

An agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) was created to support and protect the income of American farmers, as well as agricultural prices. This agency assists in maintaining an adequate variety and volume of agricultural commodity supplies. The CCC also helps to facilitate their systematic distribution.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Commodity Credit Corporation - CCC'

The CCC was created on October 17, 1933 as part of President Roosevelt's New Deal program. It was incorporated under a Delaware charter and given intial capitalization of $3 million. It was reincorporated in 1948 as a federal corporation.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with ...
  2. Corporation

    A legal entity that is separate and distinct from its owners. ...
  3. Credit

    1. A contractual agreement in which a borrower receives something ...
  4. Capitalization

    1. In accounting, it is where costs to acquire an asset are included ...
  5. Separation Of Powers

    An organizational structure in which responsibilities, authorities, ...
  6. Nordic Model

    The social welfare and economic systems adopted by Nordic countries.
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Can private corporations issue convertible bonds?

    The first step to answering this question requires defining the term "private corporation". Many times, the term "private corporation" refers to a privately held company that is either a sole ...
  2. Options & Futures

    Why are corporations so concerned about their stock price?

    When the share price of a company is high or increasing, generally corporations, or more specifically their management teams, are happy about it and there is good reason for it.First of all, ...
  3. Investing

    When would a corporation want to refinance its debt?

    Favorable market conditions or the strengthening of a company's credit rating may lead to the refinancing of corporate debt. The two primary factors for influencing a company to refinance are ...
  4. Investing

    Why would a multinational corporation conduct a vertical foreign direct investment?

    In many cases, multinational corporations conduct horizontal foreign direct investment (FDI) activities in order to expand their operations into another market. For example, an American retailer ...
  5. Markets

    What Cuba-US Relations Could Mean For U.S. Industry

    The restoration of diplomatic relations with Cuba could mean big profits for U.S. travel, agriculture, and financial services sectors.
  6. Entrepreneurship

    How is venture capital regulated by the government?

    Learn about some of the ways in which the U.S. government and the Securities and Exchange Commission regulate venture capital.
  7. Economics

    What country is the world's largest coal producer?

    Producing nearly 50% of the world's supply, China is the world's largest global coal producer and a large force in global coal pricing and trade.
  8. Economics

    What is the affect of the invisible hand on the government?

    Find out why government policy goals are often frustrated by the same forces that guide the invisible hand of the market towards efficient outcomes.
  9. Economics

    How does government regulation impact the railroads sector?

    Explore different ways that government regulation has affected the railroad sector. Learn about key laws that have been passed that impacted it.
  10. Economics

    What regulations are in place that affect fracking?

    Read about some of the regulations that impact the practice of hydraulic fracturing, which is used to increase oil and gas well output.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Multiplier Effect

    The expansion of a country's money supply that results from banks being able to lend. The size of the multiplier effect depends ...
  2. Command Economy

    A system where the government, rather than the free market, determines what goods should be produced, how much should be ...
  3. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  4. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  5. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  6. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
Trading Center