Commodity Trader

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DEFINITION of 'Commodity Trader'

Unlike stock traders, who buy and sell equities, commodity traders focus on investing in commodities. These traders either takes positions based on forecasted economic trends or arbitrage opportunities in the commodity markets. Oil and gold are two of the most common traded commodities, but markets exist for cotton, wheat, sugar, cattle, pork bellies, lumber, silver and other precious metals.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Commodity Trader'

Commodity traders usually do not have a need for the specific asset they are trading, but gain exposure through forward and future contracts. Contracts are usually hedged and actual delivery is a seldom occurrence.

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