Commodity Selection Index - CSI

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DEFINITION of 'Commodity Selection Index - CSI'

A technical momentum indicator that attempts to identify which commodities are the most suitable for short-term trading. The larger the CSI value, the stronger is the trend and volatility characteristics associated with the asset. This indicator should only be used by traders who can handle large amounts of volatility as it indicates strong trending, but reversals are always possible.

BREAKING DOWN 'Commodity Selection Index - CSI'

Short-term traders know that the key to making money is movement, which is the reason that they mainly focus on the highly volatile assets. This index attempts to lessen the amount of risk taken, and make it easier to trade by incorporating trend characteristics. Some traders will only trade the commodity with the highest CSI value, while others will make transaction signals when they see a sharp increase in this value.

RELATED TERMS
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