Co-mortgagor

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DEFINITION of 'Co-mortgagor'

A party or individual who cosigns a mortgage loan. Co-mortgagors are jointly liable with the other mortgagor for the balance of the mortgage. Often the co-mortgagor will also receive a portion of the ownership in the asset in exchange for assisting with the loan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Co-mortgagor'

It is not necessary to be a co-owner of the mortgaged property in order to be a comortgager. However, prospective co-mortgagors should carefully evaluate the financial stability of the mortgagor before signing on the dotted line. One possible situation where it might make sense to be on the mortgage but not the title of a property is where the co-mortgager is needed to qualify for the loan, but ownership of the property would create estate planning issues.

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