Comparative Statement

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DEFINITION of 'Comparative Statement'

A statement which compares financial data from different periods of time. The comparative statement lines up a section of the income statement, balance sheet or cash flow statement with its corresponding section from a previous period. It can also be used to compare financial data from different companies over time, thus revealing the trend in the financials.

BREAKING DOWN 'Comparative Statement'

Analysts like comparative statements because they show the effect business decisions have on a company's bottom line. Analysts can identify trends and evaluate the performance of managers, new lines of business and new products on one statement instead of having to flip through individual financial statements from different periods of time. When comparing different companies, a comparative statement can show how businesses react to market conditions affecting an entire industry.



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