Completion Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Completion Bond'

A financial contract that insures a given project will be completed even if the producer runs out of money, or any measure of financial or other impediment occurs during the production of the project. Completion bonds are used in many industries, including major films and construction projects.

They may be part of a mortgage financing deal, and serve to protect both the mortgagor and mortgagee. A third party financier, a completion guarantor company, is typically brought in to provide the financial backstop in the event that original financing is insufficient to complete the project. Also known as a completion guarantee.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Completion Bond'

Completion bonds are often standard pre-project material for any large construction project or complex project involving large sums of money and/or multiple investors. They are a longstanding tradition in the entertainment business, where many variables can come into play which may affect the completion of a large movie project.

A third party guarantor will assess the risk to the projects completion and collect a premium for insuring the particular risks to a given project being completed on time, and on budget. Investors become much more likely to get involved, knowing that the project will be completed enough to be sold so they can recoup their investment.

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