Compliance Officer


DEFINITION of 'Compliance Officer'

An employee whose responsibilities include ensuring that the company complies with its outside regulatory requirements and internal policies. A compliance officer may review and set standards for outside communications by requiring disclaimers in emails, or may examine facilities to ensure that they are accessible and safe. Compliance officers may also design or update internal policies to mitigate the risk of the company breaking laws and regulations, as well as lead internal audits of procedures.

BREAKING DOWN 'Compliance Officer'

Compliance officers are expected to provide an objective view of company policies. Influence by other employees, including management and executives, to overlook infractions may result in significant fines or even business closure. Larger companies typically have a Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) to direct compliance-related activities.

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