Comprehensive Income

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DEFINITION of 'Comprehensive Income'

The change in a company's net assets from nonowner sources over a specified period of time. Comprehensive income is a statement of all income and expenses recognized during that period. The statement includes revenue, finance costs, tax expenses, discontinued operations, profit share and profit/loss.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Comprehensive Income'

Companies typically report comprehensive income in a separate statement from income resulting from owner changes in equity, but have the option of providing information in a single statement. Many firms shy away from the single statement approach because it mixes owner and nonowner activity, which can muddle the underlying information.

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