Comptroller General

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DEFINITION of 'Comptroller General'

A high-ranking accounting position in the U.S. government. Appointed by the President of the United States, the Comptroller General serves as the head of the Government Accountability Office (GAO), and is ultimately responsible for the fiscal activities of the U.S. government.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Comptroller General'

The GAO actually audits and oversees the spending activities of the U.S. government, both domestically and around the world. The Comptroller General is a critical position in the U.S. government, and he/she is responsible for tracking the effectiveness of spending policies. The Comptroller General reports the GAO's findings to Congress.

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