Comptroller General


DEFINITION of 'Comptroller General'

A high-ranking accounting position in the U.S. government. Appointed by the President of the United States, the Comptroller General serves as the head of the Government Accountability Office (GAO), and is ultimately responsible for the fiscal activities of the U.S. government.

BREAKING DOWN 'Comptroller General'

The GAO actually audits and oversees the spending activities of the U.S. government, both domestically and around the world. The Comptroller General is a critical position in the U.S. government, and he/she is responsible for tracking the effectiveness of spending policies. The Comptroller General reports the GAO's findings to Congress.

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  1. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>
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